¡Por supuesto! para todo ello existen muchas propuestas con soluciones muy interesantes, pero hacer cambios experimentales sobre el código de Bitcoin es arriesgado y, que la mayoría de nodos se adapten, lleva tiempo. Bitcoin es grande y esto hace que la toma de decisiones sea lenta al reflexionarse los cambios de manera muy profunda. Esta toma de decisiones lenta e incapacidad del protocolo de ampliar con modulos las capacidades de Bitcoin es el principal motivo por el que empezaron a salir otras criptomendas centradas en nichos y casos de usos concretos. Era más sencillo clonarse el código abierto de Bitcoin y adaptartlo que esperar a que en Bitcoin se decidiese aceptar su funcionalidad. Este es, principalmente, el motivo por el cual hay cientos de criptomonedas y se necesita un wallet por cada una de ellas, siendo un absoluto caos a veces, ya que todas están desconectadas entre ellas.
“Blockchain offers a possible solution to these challenges with its decentralized ledger that can store a history of transactions across a shared database,” Cohen said in the report. “By making the record accessible and verifiable from anywhere in the world, blockchain can enable the authentication of goods and eradicate the criminal element of counterfeit goods in the retail supply chain. By pairing hardware chips with blockchain technology, a product can take on a digital history, going as far back as the raw materials that were used to make the product. This allows retailers and consumers to verify their purchased products are genuine.”

Of course, the drawbacks of public and private blockchains are still very much present in the case consortium chains. This all depends on the way each consortium is constructed: a more public consortium chain will bear the burdens of public chains, while a more private one might suffer from the relative lack of openness and disintermediation. The right configuration depends on the needs and vision for each specific chain. Strategy and tailoring are always necessary to get the best solution.

A public blockchain has absolutely no access restrictions. Anyone with an internet connection can send transactions[disambiguation needed] to it as well as become a validator (i.e., participate in the execution of a consensus protocol).[84][self-published source?] Usually, such networks offer economic incentives for those who secure them and utilize some type of a Proof of Stake or Proof of Work algorithm.
A private blockchain on the other hand provides only the owner to have the rights on any changes that have to be done. This could be seen as a similar version to the existing infrastructure wherein the owner (a centralized authority) would have the power to change the rules, revert transactions, etc. based on the need. This could be a concept with huge interest from FI’s and large companies. It could find use cases to build proprietary systems and reduce the costs, while at the same time increase their efficiency. Some of the examples could be:
This type of permissioned blockchain model offers the ability to leverage more than 30 years of technical literature to realize significant benefits. Digital identity in particular, is fundamental for most industry use cases, be it handling supply chain challenges, disrupting the financial industry, or facilitating security-rich patient/provider data exchanges in healthcare. Only the entities participating in a particular transaction will have knowledge and access to it — other entities will have no access to it. Permissioned blockchains also permit a couple of orders of magnitude greater scalability in terms of transactional throughput.
×