– A consensus much faster: the fact that the consensus mechanism is centralized makes it much quicker. In fact, the term “consensus” is no longer adapted since it is rather a recording of transactions on the blockchain. Note that the entity responsible for managing the blockchain can decide to change the parameters of the blockchain and in particular to increase the size of the blocks to be able to add more transactions.

Let us call the current Bitcoin System Bitcoin 1.0 and the sidechain Bitcoin 2.0 So one would take one unit of Bitcoin 1.0 and send it to an unspendable address (e.g. 1111111111111111111114bRaS3) they’d also submit cryptographic proof of the transaction signed by the same private key that sent the transaction as a transaction into Bitcoin 2.0. The protocol of Bitcoin 2.0 would entitle the user to receive one unit of Bitcoin 2.0  This is called “One-way Pegging” as the value of one Bitcoin 2.0 is equal to one Bitcoin 1.0.  This system is only one way and creates a wormhole by which Bitcoin 1.0 disappears as there is no way of getting it back.


New distribution methods are available for the insurance industry such as peer-to-peer insurance, parametric insurance and microinsurance following the adoption of blockchain.[71][72] The sharing economy and IoT are also set to benefit from blockchains because they involve many collaborating peers.[73] Online voting is another application of the blockchain.[74][75]
By the end of this post, you’ll be able to freely participate in conversations like the above. This is not a coding tutorial, as we’ll just be presenting important concepts at a high level. However, we may follow up with programming tutorials on these ideas. This article will be helpful to both programmers and non-programmers alike. Let’s get going!
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Blockstream believes that to be secure, blockchain systems must be built with open source technology. Towards that goal, we've created the Elements Project, a community of people extending and improving the Bitcoin codebase. As open source, protocol-level technology, developers can use Elements to extend the functionality of Bitcoin and explore new applications of the blockchain. Join the expanding group of individual and corporate developers using Elements to build robust, advanced, and innovative blockchains.
This construction is achieved by composing smart contracts on the main blockchain using fraud proofs whereby state transitions can be enforced on a parent blockchain. We compose blockchains into a tree hierarchy, and treat each as an individual branch blockchain with enforced blockchain history and MapReducable computation committed into merkle proofs. By framing one’s ledger entry into a child blockchain which is enforced by the parent chain, one can enable incredible scale with minimized trust (presuming root blockchain availability and correctness).

– The transactions added to the blockchain are public: the whole world (Member of the network as non-members) can access transactions that are added to the blockchain. The information of the transactions is made public for the miners who do not know the other members, to check the conformity (for example that the person who has created a transaction holds enough bitcoins). These transactions are obviously not nominative, only your public key appears, but if someone knows your public key, he will be able to find all the transactions that you have created.

Zestminds is an IT consulting and services provider, providing end-to-end consulting for global clients. Zestminds has partnered with several start-ups to SME in building their next generation information infrastructure for competitive advantage. The Zestminds portfolio of services includes legacy application maintenance, large application development, e-strategy consulting and solutions. The offshore Model of the company leverages talent and inf ... Read more
There is a whole other issue of identity theft that needs to be addressed. Just a short note here as this is a big subject: If the private key to identity object is stolen, the true owner of the identity needs to have a way to change the key. One approach to that would be to use the private key of the bitcoin transaction that created the first version of the identity object. Another way could be to prove the ownership of other public keys on the identity object, like the one used for encryption (PGP key management suggests a separate key for each purpose, signing, encryption, etc.). Other non-automatic ways could include a trusted third-party, social proof, etc.

Public blockchains are just that, public. Anyone that wants to read, write, or join a public blockchain can do so. Public chains are decentralized meaning no one body has control over the network, ensuring the data can’t be changed once validated on the blockchain. Simply meaning, anyone, anywhere, can use a public blockchain to input transactions and data as long as they are connected to the network.
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