THE BIG PROBLEM: I focus on professional golfers (all levels) who have the skills, ability and talent, do well in practice, but can’t consistently play their best, under pressure, in competition. That’s a problem with their mental game. The pain they feel is they aren’t living up to their potential, can’t play on (or stay on) the PGA Tours, and aren’t having the career they believe is inside of them (and with time, it’s slipping away).
Now, online businesses can play with human psychology like the Houston airport executives and speed up evolution, but with virtually no specific formula to make website response times bearable for every individual visitor out there. Or they can actually reduce the objective length of wait in delivering the requested content to their online visitors with a fast responding website – whichever is possible when the website is designed to deliver instantaneous response and high quality, seamless user experience.
Rapport-building sounds so technical and de-personal and yet it is the heart of making any human interaction a success. Finding something in common, something not related to the merchandise in front of the customer begins to build rapport. I call it opening a Window of Contact which requires a salesperson to notice something physical like jewelry, clothing, even the type of smartphone the person in front of them has. The salesperson then comments on that item with a question and shares something related about themselves based on what that customer answered.

My target audience are small business owners that do not know a lot about online. Their problem is that they want to spend little time online but be more visible and get more clients. I help them by training them how to use website and social media effectively. The training can be done in different ways. I also set up sites and social media and make straight-forward marketingplans.

Facebook is particularly good at capturing these leads, thanks to its targeting options. You can narrow down on users based on their demographic info, interests, online behaviour and previous purchases. AdWords also has a role to play here, letting you target lower-intent searches like “how often should I audit my website?” and getting these users involved with your brand.
I think that tagline is great actually. Can a blog be ACTUALLY better than a therapist? Maybe not. But if I may give you a personal example: I see a therapist. It is absolutely one of the best things I’ve decided to do in my life. I get this for ‘free’ through public healthcare (I’m in the UK – I put free in inverted commas because people pay for their healthcare through taxes). If I had to pay for this privately, I wouldn’t currently be in a position to do so.
Fast forward to today, I now have a professional video team for my videos, and even though they cost about $1,000 per video to produce, I can still give them away each week because I’ve got a system in place that generates sales. I can also happily hire expert web designers, professional photographers, developers, and more, all because I have the balance sheet to support it.

As a software engineer myself, I can tell you that building funnels from an application standpoint takes massive amounts of work. There's a great deal of coding and integration that's required here. From email systems to landing page implementations to credit card processing APIs, and everything in between, so many platforms need to "talk," that it takes the bar too high for the average marketer. 


According to surveys done by Akamai and Gomez.com, nearly half of web users expect a site to load in 2 seconds or less, and they tend to abandon a site that isn’t loaded within 3 seconds. 79% of web shoppers who have trouble with web site performance say they won’t return to the site to buy again and around 44% of them would tell a friend if they had a poor experience shopping online.
Sign up forms and analytics code add only a few lines to website core files. But when too many single-lines of code take space on the website back-end, web content assets and plugins with lengthy code end up competing for tiny memory spaces in short processing cycles. As a result, the popular physics phenomenon of non-linearity kicks in, and each component performs unpredictably, usually consuming more processing cycles than expected.
Recommendations: Display recommendations for similar products on your payment confirmation page post-purchase to instantly “upsell” your customers on another add-on, plug-in, or accompanying product. Customers who have just spent money in your store are more likely to buy again, so take advantage of this. E-Commerce giants such as Amazon suggest recommendations in an incredibly sophisticated manner, and indication of how profitable they consider them to be.

The idea of using a funnel as a metaphor for Sales & Marketing processes in business really stems from the classic Marketing concept, AIDA. Attention, Interest, Desire, Action. These 4 elements generally describe how you build customer relationships, but they can also describe lots of other things too (like how to structure a really good sales letter or sales pitch).


Professionals, new entrepreneurs and local businesses want to be successful and come across in a certain way through their online profiles and websites, but the images (photos, either headshots/portraits or other photos of products or “brand” photos) they are using are turning people away or, at least, making people second guess their credibility as a trusted source, leading to lower confidence in the person, product or company.

Problem: Many travelers (particularly American travelers, whose vacation time is at a premium) want to make sure they have the most authentic experience of a city. They don’t want to stand in line with the other tourists and come back with the same photos and stories. They don’t want to find out later that they got scammed. They definitely don’t want to feel like they missed out.
In the consideration phase, a consumer starts to associate you with the solution you offer. This is the time when you want to supply them with content that helps them evaluate you and your products. At this stage, we're speaking directly to the people we think our business can help and making sure they know how we can help them. Remember that they may not yet trust you, so don't put on your sales hat just yet. Instead, consideration content is a great opportunity to make sure it's easy for your visitor to browse all the information that might help them differentiate you from your competitors.
Regardless of what you sell, include high-quality images of your products – no tiny thumbnails or poorly lit shots taken in your stock room. Also be sure to include a wide range of images. It might seem overkill to include shots of your products from every conceivable angle, but try it out. People love to kick a product’s proverbial tires before buying, especially online.

Takeaway: We've mentioned a couple of ways to improve full-page load time already, including optimizing images, sticking to a performance budget, and avoiding third-party files that can slow load time. You can also optimize the fonts and structure of your webpages so they can be rendered faster and without preventing other aspects of the page to load. And, it can help to avoid redirect links, which automatically send users to new URLs.


For example, Glossier promotes their products using beauty influencers on Instagram. As you can see in the screenshot below, micro-influencer Grace Abbott has provided a unique promo link for their products. By following the link, her followers can get 20% off on their first order from Glossier – and Glossier can see how much Grace Abbott is worth to their brand down to the last dollar.
Revision management is one of the perks that WordPress has to offer. The CMS automatically keeps track of the content created on the CMS and makes all of it available for future changes. To the server, this costs unnecessary processing through additional database entries not actually required in the first place. Controlling the number of revisions stored relieves the website core of useless burden.
Overall, when DOM ready times throughout a visit were slower, people bounced more. Our research found that bounced sessions had DOM ready times that were 55% slower than nonbounced sessions. We also noticed that bounce rates were even higher if the first page in the visit had a significantly slower DOM ready time than the remaining pages. This tells us that first impressions matter: If people's initial experience visiting a site is slow, they're more likely to bounce later. That initial interaction seems to color people's perception of the site and decrease their willingness to be patient throughout the transaction process.
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