Very limited customer base, compete with “free,” and would like to offer solutions to parties that don’t really want what I have to offer. In other words, they “have” to meet education/inservice requirements, but they would not buy anything from me that they “want.” Make sense? Easier to sell (IMHO) something that a person “wants” rather than something they “need.” Most of my potential customers do not “do” social media professionally. There is a constant battle for them to save money where possible. Pitiful results so far.

Takeaway: One way to speed up the DOM ready time of your site is to avoid the use of JavaScript (a type of code) that blocks and prevents a browser from parsing HTML code. The most common elements with JavaScript are third-party ads, and analytics and social widgets that must be fetched from an external server before they can load. (Imagine that you're at restaurant and your waiter is ready to bring your meal, but first has to wait for the salt and pepper to be delivered from another restaurant.) For more ideas on how to prevent JavaScript from affecting DOM ready time, here's a guide for developers.
Most prospects will enter this stage after identifying Norman’s company as a possible alternative and completing the information search process described in Stage 2. However, some customers might be introduced to his brand after completing Stage 2 with his competitors, as in the case of an industry blog running a comparison chart of the different competitors in his space.
I specialize in helping you get to that first step. Sometimes we just need help working through our options. Sometimes, we just need to identify what our options are when the possibilities seem so overwhelming. You start by answering a few questions and then we have a free 30-minute to discovery session to see what’s unconsciously keeping you from moving. And if you need some help from there… you can choose from our convenient continuing support options. But it all starts with 30 minutes to make the headache go away. Are you ready?
Clearly, the idea was genius and never died—it just took on new forms over the years as the marketing universe changed. The early model has been modified over the past decades by marketing consultants and academics to cater to the changing marketplace. Several variations on the theme have been created to accommodate the emerging modes of marketing—especially, digital marketing.
We help purchasers and sellers understand the range of documentation that can be accepted or provided in each state that will protect the seller while providing the easiest path for purchaser to be compliant. We also review certificates on a case by case basis or provide exposure analysis for all of your certificate. We also provide exemption certificate management.

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Being an expert doesn’t necessarily mean that you know how to share your knowledge with others, so that they actually get it. Consequently, many information/instructional products garnished with “bells and whistles” (fancy graphics, catchy sales pitches, and technological gimmicks) actually SUCK. There is either too much or too little content; the content is confusing; the language is professional gobbledygook, the focus is on “what to do” rather than on “how to go about it” – leaving the users in a state of anger and frustration. Even if they don’t ask for their money back, they certainly won’t buy from this line ever again.
To take the same concept and bring it a bit closer to home, most of what we publish on the Moz Blog is an example of the same kind of top-of-funnel marketing. We don't publish blog posts to convince people they should buy our products. We publish them because we want people to level-up their skills and be better marketers. Our hope is that by participating in our community and reading our blog posts, if you ever find yourself in need of tools for your digital marketing efforts, that we'll be top-of-mind as a reliable choice, just as Theo is top-of-mind for many Seattleites (and now you) when seeking chocolate.
Should you panic about your load time affecting your Google rankings? The great Matt Cutts says no – that it’s just one of over 200 signals they use in determining rank. But that’s not to say you should put it off either. Optimizing your page load time is a smart thing to do to help visitors get where they’re going faster, and it’s a better use of your time than obsessively tweaking your meta-tags. According to a recent post on SEOmoz, while site speed is a new signal, it doesn’t carry as much weight as the relevance of a page. Currently, fewer than 1% of search queries are affected by the site speed signal.
The number and name of each stage may vary based on business type and sales process. But what the sales funnel represents is straightforward. You start with a lot of prospects who know your business. Sales reps qualify those prospects, and out of those, only some will proceed to the next stage to have a conversation with you. As sales reps continue to nurture leads towards the close, they trickle down the funnel until you’re left with actual customers.

Meanwhile, Google is absolutely going to continue to develop AMP and promote its use. But to speed along the standard process, it’s offering the same carrot that originally supercharged AMP’s growth: prime placement on Google’s own properties. Google is promising that any webpage that matches the performance of an AMP page will get the exact same treatment in Google search.
QUOTE: “Consider this: Mobile sites lag behind desktop sites in key engagement metrics such as average time on site, pages per visit, and bounce rate. For retailers, this can be especially costly since 30% of all online shopping purchases now happen on mobile phones. The average U.S. retail mobile site loaded in 6.9 seconds in July 2016, but, according to the most recent data, 40% of consumers will leave a page that takes longer than three seconds to load. And 79% of shoppers who are dissatisfied with site performance say they’re less likely to purchase from the same site again.” Google, 2016
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